• Barry G. Carpenter

10 Benefits of the Current Virus for the Christian

Updated: Mar 25

1) We see the commonality of all people.

We are all made in the image of God and we are all under the curse of sin. Sickness, disease, and death is the result of the Fall. In times like these, we see that people have much more in common than different. Death is no respecter of person. The differences between us are trivial in the face of death, of sin, the desire to live and to enjoy our life.

2) We have the opportunity to face our fears and anxieties.

It is natural and normal to be concerned. But these emotions should not drive us to fear, to despair or panic but to turn to Christ.  In Christ, we are renewed, refreshed and reminded of who we are, our ultimate purpose and the goodness of who He is.

3) As we are isolated, we can see the benefits of solitude.

It would do many of us good to have periods in which we practice self-isolation. We need times when we are free from the constant alerts (an interesting and telling choice of words) from social media, the fear-mongering of the mainstream news and the instant access to amusement and distract. A little time with our thoughts would do us all some good.

4) As we are isolated, we can be reminded of the value of friends and families.

We are often so busy with many things; it is easy to forget the value of  having people in our lives. There will be no saying “I love you” or “You are important to me” once death comes. May this time remind us to always be telling those we love how much they mean to us- every day- even on the normal days.

5) As we practice distancing, we can remember the value of the human touch.

A firm handshake, a grasp of the shoulder, a kiss on the cheek-  these little gestures communicate so much. We are made for relationship and created to express our emotions. After this time passes, and it will, I hope we will appreciate each other even more and be more expressive of our love and care for each other.

6) This is a great opportunity to unplug and recapture the wonder and majesty of creation.

As we are freed from the obligations of work and school, we can distract ourselves with more amusements or we can use this extra time to recover our wonder of creation. Every day is magical in a sense. Every sunset or rise is unique and amazing. Have you ever watched a spider weave a web? Or notices how no two leaves on a tree are the same? Well, now you have the time! And this will be therapy for the mind and soul. The fingerprints of God are all over His creation.

7) We can practice greater levels of giving and helping.

As others are hoarding, we can double our giving. We can challenge the fearfulness, greed, and covetousness hiding in the recesses of our hearts. We can practice and expand our faith in giving so that we will grow to trust God more and bring Him glory by imitating His abundant giving.

8) As we are quarantined, we can be reminded of the beauty of corporate worship and fellowship.

As some churches are not able to meet, we can reflect on the value of being together as the Body of Christ. There is no substitute for the people of God gathering for worship and mutual edification. While we do thank God for technology, it can never replace the “one -another-ing” we see the New Testament.

9) We can be driven to prayer.

So often we neglect prayer. It is very easy to do. Occurrences such as this remind us of our daily dependence on God, His mercies which come to us new and fresh every morning, and how we entrust our lives and souls to Him when we lay down at night.

10) We can meditate upon our mortality.

Although our culture discourages thinking in general, and anything related to considering our discomfort and ultimate demises, we will die. Each of us will leave this mortal world and body behind. It will probably occur much sooner than we think. This reality should not lead us to despair, after all, we will be delivered into realms of blessing and glory when we see our Savior. However, memento mori (“remember you will die”) can help us to define and decide the life that we want to live. We can determine our values, consider eternity and make choices so that when death does come, we can lay this life aside without fear or regret.


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